A study of Jewish Palmach veterans revealed the power of small groups to remember what nations wish to forget. It opened up questions regarding social silence, later leading to the compilation of an edited volume (again, with colleagues) on social silences in the shadow of war.

Since completing my doctorate, I've been teaching at a relatively small college. My students complain when they are asked to read in English or a whole book, but they often marvel at what Anthropology has to offer. Although most will not end up working as Anthropologists, many are ambassadors of good will for our discipline. One of my sources of joy is having students write to me, sometimes long after they have completed their studies, telling me of people that they have met, books that they have read or places that they have visited. What they have learnt in class colours their later life experiences.

What have been some of the highlights of my life as an Anthropologist? Definitely the experience of fieldwork, discovering thoughtful, sensitive, angry, forgiving, lamenting people, some becoming friends, other engraved in my memory for life; working with colleagues and learning from their unique talents and abilities; being a judge at the winter film festival in Tromso, Norway, north of the Arctic circle; having an article translated into Arabic and published in a journal edited by the great Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish; travelling to a conference on memories of war in beautiful snow-covered Japan; joining Helen on this new adventure—getting together with Kindred Spirits who share a passion for Anthropology. 

(Copyright 2011, OUAMEAS. All rights reserved.)
OXFORD UNIVERSITY 
Anthropology and Museum
Ethnography Alumni Society
Dr Efrat Ben Ze'ev, Continued
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